Love Thy Nature: Rethinking Our Connections

“We are so far away from nature, that we are running into an evolutionary wall,” explains social scientist, Duane Elgin.

Filmmaker Gayle Kirschenbaum: Reconciling with Mother

The film is Kirschenbaum’s undertaking to get to the bottom of her family’s dynamics, and why her mother had such enmity towards her. “What went wrong?” she asks.

Sexual Assault On Campus: We Believe You

“We Believe You” should be read by parents, high-school seniors, college personnel, and law-enforcement (both police and prosecutors). It needs to be placed in college and university bookstores, including those schools featured as being on the wrong side of this public epidemic.

Love Her, Love Her Not: The Hillary Paradox

In this anthology, editor Joanne C. Bamberger wants to get to the essentials of why Hillary is repeatedly judged by benchmarks markedly different than those facing a male candidate.

“Wishful Thinking” – A Lesson In Feminist Time Travel

The story’s heroine, Jennifer, is on the cusp of turning 40 while dealing with a difficult divorce, job stress, and the trials of building a life that allow her to function on all fronts.

The Affair Returns to Showtime

Yes, there’s plenty of sex. However, the show is far more than just thrusting bodies in motion.

“Wrath — Force of Nature” at Wave Hill

“Seven Deadly Sins: Wrath — Force of Nature” at Wave Hill in the Bronx brings together twelve artists who have their fingers on the pulse of climate change and extreme weather.

Shifting Sands: New Dynamics in the Bronx Art Scene

The dialogue went far deeper than a mere discussion of the current landscape of the Bronx art scene. It raised questions, and some hackles, about competing community needs, gentrification, constituencies that are too frequently powerless, and big money.

“Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life”

Adriana Zavala, guest curator, qualified Kahlo’s home as an “extension of her personal cosmology,” saying, “There are still things to learn about Kahlo.”

Ellen Weider: Drypoints in a Digital Age

Weider is preoccupied with an examination of domestic objects. Her visual terrain is repeatedly populated with diaristic contemplations of ordinary furniture: dressers, chairs, tables, beds.